Upcoming Courses and Conferences

The following may be of interest to drycleaner assessment and remediation personnel.

In addition, the Hazardous Waste Clean-Up Information (CLU-IN) website offers a list of upcoming Internet seminars on topics that may be of interest. Archived CLU-IN Internet seminars and training modules are also available. The Interstate Technology & Regulatory Council (ITRC) website also lists upcoming training courses and events.


ITRC Petroleum Vapor Intrusion: Fundamentals of Screening, Investigation, and Management
09/25/2018 - 09/25/2018
Internet Seminar,
Chemical contaminants in soil and groundwater can volatilize into soil gas and migrate through unsaturated soils of the vadose zone. Vapor intrusion (VI) occurs when these vapors migrate upward into overlying buildings through cracks and gaps in the building floors, foundations, and utility conduits, and contaminate indoor air. If present at sufficiently high concentrations, these vapors may present a threat to the health and safety of building occupants. Petroleum vapor intrusion (PVI) is a subset of VI and is the process by which volatile petroleum hydrocarbons (PHCs) released as vapors from light nonaqueous phase liquids (LNAPL), petroleum-contaminated soils, or petroleum-contaminated groundwater migrate through the vadose zone and into overlying buildings. The ITRC Technical and Regulatory Guidance Web-Based Document, Petroleum Vapor Intrusion: Fundamentals of Screening, Investigation, and Management (PVI-1, 2014) and this associated Internet-based training provide regulators and practitioners with consensus information based on empirical data and recent research to support PVI decision making under different regulatory frameworks. The PVI assessment strategy described in this guidance document enables confident decision making that protects human health for various types of petroleum sites and multiple PHC compounds. This guidance provides a comprehensive methodology for screening, investigating, and managing potential PVI sites and is intended to promote the efficient use of resources and increase confidence in decision making when evaluating the potential for vapor intrusion at petroleum-contaminated sites. By using the ITRC guidance document, the vapor intrusion pathway can be eliminated from further investigation at many sites where soil or groundwater is contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons or where LNAPL is present.
For more information, please visit https://clu-in.org/live


FRTR PresentsÂ…Evolution of Subsurface Remediation: Lessons Learned from Technical Challenges to Achieving Cleanup Goals - Part 1
09/27/2018 - 09/27/2018
Internet Seminar,
This is part one of a two-part webinar series featuring presentations delivered at the Spring 2018 FRTR Meeting. The meetings goals were to identify and discuss case studies where remediation technologies were successful for a variety of soil and groundwater systems; and to share experiences and lessons learned that contributed to the operation of these successful remediation technologies. Part 2 will be held on October 17, 2018.
For more information, please visit https://clu-in.org/live


Superfund Research Program Progress in Research Webinar Part 4: Boston University, Texas A&M University, and University of California, Davis
10/01/2018 - 10/01/2018
Internet Seminar,
This Superfund Research Program (SRP) Progress in Research webinar series highlights promising research from SRP Centers awarded grants in 2017. In this session, awardees Boston University, Texas A&M University, and University of California, Davis, will describe their research projects, accomplishments, and next steps. The Boston University SRP Center explores the long-term impacts of early life exposure to Superfund chemicals in humans and wildlife. Their work focuses on contaminants including polychlorinated biphenyls and tetrachloroethylene found in and around the New Bedford Harbor Superfund site and in drinking water of nearby communities. The Texas A&M University SRP Center focuses on developing comprehensive tools and models for addressing exposure to mixtures during emergency-related environmental contamination events. The researchers are evaluating the complexities of hazardous chemical exposures, potential adverse health impacts, and potential hazards of exposures to complex mixtures through projects that derive from a case study utilizing the Texas Galveston Bay area. The University of California, Davis SRP Center uses integrated chromatographic, biosensor, and cell-based technologies to detect and identify contaminants and develop innovative approaches for bioremediation. The Center is expanding the use of transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and integrated bioinformatics technologies to discover new mechanisms of action of hazardous materials and biological markers for their action and to connect hazardous substance exposures to organism level effects.
For more information, please visit https://clu-in.org/live


ITRC Integrated DNAPL Site Characterization
10/02/2018 - 10/02/2018
Internet Seminar,
The Integrated DNAPL Site Characterization Team has synthesized the knowledge about dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) site characterization and remediation acquired over the past several decades, and has integrated that information into a new document, Integrated DNAPL Site Characterization and Tools Selection (ISC-1, 2015). This guidance is a resource to inform regulators, responsible parties, other problem holders, consultants, community stakeholders, and other interested parties of the critical concepts related to characterization approaches and tools for collecting subsurface data at DNAPL sites. After this associated training, participants will be able to use the guidance to develop and support an integrated approach to DNAPL site characterization, including: identify what site conditions must be considered when developing an informative DNAPL conceptual site model (CSM); define an objectives-based DNAPL characterization strategy; understand what tools and resources are available to improve the identification, collection, and evaluation of appropriate site characterization data; and navigate the DNAPL characterization tools table and select appropriate technologies to fill site-specific data gaps.
For more information, please visit https://clu-in.org/live


Building Cultural Competence
10/10/2018 - 10/10/2018
Atlanta, GA

What is the course overview?
Culture-based dynamics can be especially noticeable when presenting highly technical information to communities concerned about environmental impacts. Building Cultural Competence (BCC) is a highly interactive awareness- and skills-building workshop. Participants experience a refreshing new way to look at, talk about and manage diversity both within EPA site teams and with communities. Untethered from traditional methods of addressing these dynamics, participants are free to explore new avenues for functional relationship building and collaborative problem-solving even in the presence of deep mistrust and striking interpersonal difference. Core concepts include taking personal responsibility for the quality of one’s work life and generating positive field results based on enlightened self-interest. BCC can help create a more productive, satisfying experience for all staff teams and for the communities they serve.

Who should take this course?
This course is recommended for both new and seasoned Community Involvement Coordinators (CICs) as well as public involvement and technical staff. There are no prerequisites for this course.

What are the course learning objectives?
Participants who complete this course will gain increased awareness and comfort with:

Participants who complete this course will learn and practice skills that will help them:

What are the logistics?
This course is offered as a full day, interactive workshop. Regions can customize the course to their intended staff and needs by conducting a scoping call with the facilitators about four weeks before the training. Participants should wear comfortable clothing and be prepared for frank discussions in small and large group sessions. Recommended course size is 12-30 participants. Michael J. Lythcott, a Senior Associate at Skeo Solutions with 35 years of management and technical expertise, teaches this course with to 1-2 junior facilitators. Mr. Lythcott has provided community and stakeholder analysis, facilitation, conflict resolution, training, and communications services for private industry, government agencies, and grassroots community organizations, both domestically and abroad.

Is there available background material?
Participants receive presentation copies and handouts on key skills/takeaways.


For more information, please visit http://www.trainex.org/classdetails.cfm?courseid=1753&classid=7919


Petroleum Vapor Intrusion: Fundamentals of Screening, Investigation, and Management
10/10/2018 - 10/11/2018
Des Moines, WA

Petroleum vapor intrusion is the process by which volatile petroleum hydrocarbons released as vapors from light nonaqueous phase liquids (LNAPL), petroleum-contaminated soils, or petroleum-contaminated groundwater migrate through the vadose zone and into overlying buildings. Fortunately, this migration is often limited by microorganisms that are normally present in soil. The organisms consume these chemicals, reducing them to nontoxic end products through the process of biodegradation. The ITRC Technical and Regulatory Guidance Web-Based Document, Petroleum Vapor Intrusion: Fundamentals of Screening, Investigation, and Management (PVI-1, 2014) and associated training provide a comprehensive methodology for screening, investigating, and managing potential PVI sites and is intended to promote the efficient use of resources and increase confidence in decision making when evaluating the potential for vapor intrusion at petroleum-contaminated sites. By using the ITRC guidance document, the vapor intrusion pathway can be eliminated from further investigation at many sites where soil or groundwater is contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons or where LNAPL is present.

This event combines the 2-day classroom training on Petroleum Vapor Intrusion from the Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council (ITRC) with an additional bonus day providing a vapor intrusion update from the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality. This 2-day ITRC classroom training led by internationally recognized experts should enable you to:

Interactive learning with classroom exercises and Q&A sessions will reinforce these course learning objectives. You will also have the opportunity to network with other environmental professionals.


For more information, please visit http://www.trainex.org/classdetails.cfm?courseid=1675&classid=7829


FRTR PresentsÂ…Evolution of Subsurface Remediation: Lessons Learned from Technical Challenges to Achieving Cleanup Goals - Part 2
10/17/2018 - 10/17/2018
Internet Seminar,
This is part two of a two-part webinar series featuring presentations delivered at the Spring 2018 FRTR Meeting. The meetings goals were to identify and discuss case studies where remediation technologies were successful for a variety of soil and groundwater systems; and to share experiences and lessons learned that contributed to the operation of these successful remediation technologies. Part 1 will be held on September 27, 2018.
For more information, please visit https://clu-in.org/live


Groundwater High-Resolution Site Characterization (HRSC)
03/26/2019 - 03/27/2019
Chicago, IL

The Groundwater High-Resolution Site Characterization (HRSC) training course focuses on groundwater characterization and discusses (1) the impacts of subsurface heterogeneity on the investigation and cleanup of groundwater and related media, (2) the need for scale-appropriate measurements and adequate data density, and (3) the tools and strategies that are available to overcome the impacts of subsurface heterogeneity. The course addresses the following technical content:

After taking this course, participants will be armed with information that will allow them to improve their subsurface investigation approaches and develop more realistic and comprehensive conceptual site models (CSM). CSMs developed based on HRSC strategies and tools will decrease site uncertainty, improve the remedy selection process for groundwater remedies, and better enable the evaluation, design, and implementation of targeted in situ and ex situ groundwater remedies.

The Groundwater HRSC course is an advanced 2-day course. The recommended audience includes EPA, federal, state, tribal and private industry technical project managers, practitioners and other stakeholders involved in groundwater investigation and remediation.

*This course is offered free of charge to all registrants who are confirmed to attend.*


For more information, please visit http://www.trainex.org/classdetails.cfm?courseid=1389&classid=7899


RPM 201
05/21/2019 - 05/23/2019
Seattle, WA

RPM 201, an intermediate-level training course, expands on the Remedial Process course. The course is offered as part of the ongoing effort to prepare RPMs for the challenges they will encounter during all aspects of a remedial action. The instructional methodology will include case studies to provide participants an opportunity to apply the skills learned during the course. The course will also include time for participants to ask specific questions about their own sites they currently are working on, as well as emerging technical and programmatic policy and guidance from EPA Headquarters. By taking the course, participants will achieve the following objectives:

RPM 201 is a 2-½-day training recommended for RPMs with at least six months of experience and may have assisted other RPMs with remedial actions or now are preparing to take the lead in conducting a remedial action. While RPM 201 may be most beneficial to new RPMs with 5 years of experience or less, the course is very interactive and more experienced RPMs that attend will be encouraged to share their field background with the class. THIS COURSE IS NOT OPEN TO ACADEMIA, CONSULTANTS, CONTRACTORS OR ANY PRIVATE ENTITIES. Superfund 101 and the Remedial Process course are prerequisites for EPA attendees to participate in RPM 201.

*This course is offered free of charge to all registrants who are confirmed to attend.*


For more information, please visit http://www.trainex.org/classdetails.cfm?courseid=1374&classid=7921


Hazard Ranking System
08/20/2019 - 08/23/2019
Philadelphia, PA

Hazard Ranking System (HRS) is a 4-day training course designed for personnel who are required to compile, draft and review preliminary assessments (PA), site inspections (SI), and HRS documentation records and packages submitted for sites proposed for the National Priorities List (NPL). This course is open to EPA, federal, state, tribal and contractor personnel who support site investigation programs.

The HRS course provides a detailed review of the HRS model and how the model is applied to various site conditions. The course is intended to enable staff to prepare HRS packages for the National Priorities List (NPL) and to plan and implement preliminary assessments (PA) and site inspections (SI) to address future HRS scoring issues. By taking the course, participants will achieve the following objectives:

It is recommended that you take the Hazard Ranking System training course prior to the Preliminary Assessment and Site Inspection training course.

*This course is offered free of charge to all registrants who are confirmed to attend.*


For more information, please visit http://www.trainex.org/classdetails.cfm?courseid=38&classid=7928


Groundwater High-Resolution Site Characterization (HRSC)
11/13/2019 - 11/14/2019
Boston, MA

The Groundwater High-Resolution Site Characterization (HRSC) training course focuses on groundwater characterization and discusses (1) the impacts of subsurface heterogeneity on the investigation and cleanup of groundwater and related media, (2) the need for scale-appropriate measurements and adequate data density, and (3) the tools and strategies that are available to overcome the impacts of subsurface heterogeneity. The course addresses the following technical content:

After taking this course, participants will be armed with information that will allow them to improve their subsurface investigation approaches and develop more realistic and comprehensive conceptual site models (CSM). CSMs developed based on HRSC strategies and tools will decrease site uncertainty, improve the remedy selection process for groundwater remedies, and better enable the evaluation, design, and implementation of targeted in situ and ex situ groundwater remedies.

The Groundwater HRSC course is an advanced 2-day course. The recommended audience includes EPA, federal, state, tribal and private industry technical project managers, practitioners and other stakeholders involved in groundwater investigation and remediation.

*This course is offered free of charge to all registrants who are confirmed to attend.*


For more information, please visit http://www.trainex.org/classdetails.cfm?courseid=1389&classid=7900