Drycleaner Site Profiles

Ideal Drycleaners, Livingston, Overton County, Tennessee

Description
Historical activity that resulted in contamination.

The Ideal Drycleaners site consists of an abandoned and demolished former drycleaning facility. The facility is situated in downtown Livingston on about 0.4 acres (17,300 ft2) in a mixed-use, residential and commercial block. The drycleaner property is flat; however, the grade of the street and adjacent properties is such that runoff drains south, then west to a storm water network which is routed to a channelized tributary of Town Creek. Ideal began drycleaning operations in the 1940's and ceased in 1983. The facility mainly used stoddard solvent but also used tetrachloroethylene (PCE) during its operation. It also operated a fuel island for its fleet of delivery trucks. No records of solvent usage rates, wastes, or disposal for the operation were found. During demolition, three above-ground storage tanks (ASTs) were observed, and two underground storage tanks (USTs) were discovered at the site. One UST was ruptured and released its contents to the soil and drainage network. Four additional USTs were later found at the site. PCE in free-product form was detected in one tank, all others contained mostly water contaminated with petroleum products, including stoddard solvent. Historical releases are assumed to have occurred through leaking tanks, the leaking pipes, and spills around filling ports and distribution points.

Contaminants
Contaminants present and the highest amount detected in both soil and groundwater.


Contaminant Media Concentration (ppb) Nondetect
Benzene groundwater 208 ppb
Benzene soil 65 ppb
sec-butylbenzene groundwater 36 ppb
sec-butylbenzene soil 9,200 ppb
tert butylbenzene groundwater 18 ppb
tert butylbenzene soil 3,100 ppb
cis-1,2-Dichloroethene groundwater 80 ppb
1,2-Dichloroethane groundwater 5 ppb
ethylbenzene groundwater 21 ppb
ethylbenzene soil 2,100 ppb
No corresponding contaminant groundwater 24.7 ppb
methylene chloride groundwater 19 ppb
methylene chloride soil 74 ppb
n-butylbenzene groundwater 48 ppb
n-butylbenzene soil 3,900 ppb
n-propylbenzene groundwater 66 ppb
n-propylbenzene soil 5,450 ppb
Tetrachloroethene (PCE) groundwater 16 ppb
Tetrachloroethene (PCE) soil 3,820 ppb
p-isopropyltoluene soil 9,100 ppb
1,2,4-trimethylbenzene groundwater 399 ppb
1,2,4-trimethylbenzene soil 74,000 ppb
1,3,5-trimethylbenzene groundwater 154 ppb
1,3,5-trimethylbenzene soil 29,000 ppb
naphthalene groundwater 101 ppb
naphthalene soil 1,518 ppb
Trichloroethene (TCE) groundwater 5 ppb
toluene soil 3,320 ppb
m-Xylene groundwater 17 ppb
o-Xylene groundwater 15 ppb

Site Hydrology

Deepest Significant Groundwater Contamination:   25ft bgs
Plume Size:  
Average Depth to Groundwater:   22.5ft

Lithology and Subsurface Geology

 
  mottled reddish-brown silty clay with some sandy and cherty zones
Depth: 0-60ft bgs
60ft thick
Conductivity: 0.013ft/day
Mississippian Age carbonated rock (Monteagle Limestone, St. Louis Limestone, and Warsaw Formation)
  bedrock karstic aquifers
Depth: 60ft bgs

Pathways and DNAPL Presence

checkGroundwater
Sediments
checkSoil
DNAPL Present

Remediation Scenario

Cleanup Goals:
  TPH: 250 mg/kg
EPA Region 9 PRGs for all other contaminants

Technologies

Ex Situ Soil Removal
 

Why the technology was selected:
Excavation and disposal was selected as an expedient and effective remedy to remove the source area and minimize existing health risks.

Date implemented:
June 2000 (emergency response efforts) 2001 (primary removal of contaminated soil)

Final remediation design:
The remedy consisted of excavation of soil in an area of about 50ft x 25ft x 5ft. Excavation was to terminate at the anticipated extent of contamination; however, additional USTs and zones of contamination were identified during the excavation. This resulted in an area of approximately 100ft x 75ft x 20ft. The excavation was backfilled with clean soil from a local source with similar geology of parent material. Prior to backfilling, the walls were lined with a polybarrier to prevent recontamination from contamination remaining beneath buildings.

Other technologies used:
The release into the soil and drainage network that resulted from the tank rupture that occurred during demolition created a vapor intrusion problem for area residents and businesses. An emergency response action was implemented in which a catch basin, leading to a trench drain running under a neighboring residence, was plugged with concrete to prevent contaminant migration, and an explosion-proof blower aerated the fumes beneath the house.

Results to date:
Remedial actions, completed in 2002, removed contaminated soil up to the contiguous structures serving as residences, apartments, businesses, and the church. Approximately 144,000 ft3 (240ft x 40ft x 15ft) of contaminated soil remains beneath the buildings.

Next Steps:
None

Cost to Design and Implement:
$1,172,800 (Excavation, Disposal, Site Restoration)

Ex Situ Other
 

Why the technology was selected:
Excavation and disposal was selected as an expedient and effective remedy to remove the source area and minimize existing health risks.

Date implemented:
June 2000 (emergency response efforts) 2001 (primary removal of contaminated soil)

Final remediation design:
The remedy consisted of excavation of soil in an area of about 50ft x 25ft x 5ft. Excavation was to terminate at the anticipated extent of contamination; however, additional USTs and zones of contamination were identified during the excavation. This resulted in an area of approximately 100ft x 75ft x 20ft. The excavation was backfilled with clean soil from a local source with similar geology of parent material. Prior to backfilling, the walls were lined with a polybarrier to prevent recontamination from contamination remaining beneath buildings.

Other technologies used:
The release into the soil and drainage network that resulted from the tank rupture that occurred during demolition created a vapor intrusion problem for area residents and businesses. An emergency response action was implemented in which a catch basin, leading to a trench drain running under a neighboring residence, was plugged with concrete to prevent contaminant migration, and an explosion-proof blower aerated the fumes beneath the house.

Results to date:
Remedial actions, completed in 2002, removed contaminated soil up to the contiguous structures serving as residences, apartments, businesses, and the church. Approximately 144,000 ft3 (240ft x 40ft x 15ft) of contaminated soil remains beneath the buildings.

Next Steps:
None

Cost to Design and Implement:
$1,172,800 (Excavation, Disposal, Site Restoration)

Costs

Cost for Assessment:
  $70,000 (Initial Stabilization)
$12,200 (Emergency Investigation)
$31,600 (Emergency Evaluation)
Cost for Operation and Maintenance:
 
Total Costs for Cleanup:
  $1,286,600

Lessons Learned

None reported.

Contacts

John F. Hoffelt
TN Division of Remediation
Nashville Field Office
711 R.S. Gass Blvd
Nashville, TN 37243
615-687-7000

Site Specific References

1. PA/SI, Ideal Dry Cleaners (Livingston Tank Rupture), PA/SI 2004.